The Top 10 Surprising Health Benefits Of A Cup of Tea

The Top 10 Surprising Health Benefits Of A Cup of Tea

The great British cup of tea… I have to admit as I sit here cup in hand, I am slightly addicted.  Meeting up with my with my girl friends at the local coffee shop on a Friday morning wouldn’t be right for me without my nice cup of tea.  In recent years coffee has made an increasing dent in the British cuppa and around our table each Friday morning I am often the only one with a tea where latte, hot chocolate and cappuccino reign.

My relationship with tea is becoming  rather love/ hate recently.

It all started one Saturday morning, which is dancing morning in our house.  As we live closest to the hall the mums all pop back for a cuppa while the kids are in class.  It’s a win win, they get to dance, we get to chat and drink tea.  So I pop on the kettle and make our drinks and while chatting I carry a couple of cups through to the front room.   Big mistake, before I even have time to react I’m down, face planting the floor.  You’d actually be surprised how far a cup of tea actually goes when catapulted through the air!

In my house I’ve already ditched the kettle in favour of hot water plumbed in as wrist dislocations were becoming commonplace.  However I didn’t expect the wrist dislocation in Costa while I was sat happily minding my own business.  It caused me to spill almost my whole cuppa and scold myself in the process.  A switch away from a traditional tea cup to a take away cup was all that was needed, now I can use two hands and avoid getting wet!

When my dysautonomia symptoms are flaring a cup of tea can be both a blessing and a curse.  On the one hand it can be a little pick me up when my energy levels are waning but of the other the caffeine can also send my heart racing and a cuppa before bed is a definite no no as it can stop me from sleeping.  Decaf tea just doesn’t hit the spot.

But you can’t deny the satisfying hug of a warm cup of tea at the end of a long day or the problems that can be solved by simply popping on the kettle and having a chat.  The British have known for years that tea is the very lifeblood of our nation, but I’m surprised to learn the that this fact now seems to be rooted in science.  Studies have shown that tea can offer more than a simple caffeine fix with tremendous health benefits, all the more reason to keep drinking it I say.  So here are my top 10 reasons to drink tea every day.

Sign saying 'tea people'

#1 A Cup of Tea reduces the risk of heart disease

Tea can potentially improve the blood flow in the body, by widening arteries and reducing the risk of clots.  It also contains antioxidants called ‘flavonoids’, which may slow down the onset and risk of heart disease.

 

#2 Tea hydrates your body

Although water is the first choice to rehydrate the body, drinking a cup of tea may be another good option health-wise. Being rich in caffeine, tea provides you a rich and flavoursome source of water along with a wide range of nutrients.

 

#3 Tea prevents tooth decay

Believe it or not, a regular supply of tea can really strengthen your teeth and lower the risk of tooth decay. Tea is a great source of fluoride, which can bolster tooth enamel. The antioxidants contained within a cuppa have also been known to fight against bacteria and gum disease.

 

#4 A Cup Of Tea can make you slim

Some scientific studies have suggested that regular intake of tea (especially in the morning and before lunch) complements your weight loss goal. A cup of tea prevents you from putting on weight along with speeding up the burning of calories. If nothing else, it is less fattening than sipping on a soft drink.

 

#5 Tea boosts your memory power

Extensive research has shown that the combination of caffeine and L-Theanine, a naturally-occurring amino acid found in tea, improves reaction time and memory, while increasing focus and concentration.

 

#6 Tea fights against dementia

To stay sharp, even as you age, drink tea, as it is thought to lower the risk of dementia by acting through multiple pathways, including those of nerve synapses and blood sugar regulation.  Many scientists believe that certain types of tea such as green tea, can strengthen the function of memory cells in the brain.  No wonder why our parents and grandparents used to drink so much tea!

 

#7 A Cup of Tea protects against cancer

Some recent studies have recently suggested that tea drinking could lower your chances of suffering from cancer. Several reports indicate that prostate, mouth and breast cancer cases are much lower amongst those who regularly drink five or more cups of tea a day as compared to people who do not drink tea. Although research in this regard is just coming into existence, the anti-cancer property is attributed to the presence of antioxidants in tea.

 

#8 Tea may help lower inflammation

Active compounds in tea can help to lower levels of inflammation and inflammatory reactions. As we well know inflammation is connected to almost every modern ailment, including arthritis, metabolic syndrome, and depression. Inflammation can also cause you to retain water and look puffy, so a few cups of tea can help you look and feel thinner.

 

girl holding a cup of tea

#9 Tea is an anti-allergen

A Japanese study has found that the tea polyphenol, EGCG, may be helpful for reducing pollen allergies. Tea may also reduce allergic response through quercetin, a flavanol naturally-occurring in tea, which is known to mitigate histamine response.  Which may be great for those with Mast Cell issues.

 

#10  A Cup of Tea may improve your overall health

Tea drinkers tend to be healthier, which is proven in research too, as tea drinking correlates with better health outcomes.  You can support your health, including your skin and body composition, with as few as 2-3 cups per day of this calorie-free drink.  Just don’t add sugar!

What is your little pick me up? Does tea hit the spot for you?

 

The Top 10 Surprising Health Benefits Of A Cup of Tea

The great British cup of tea… I have to admit as I sit here cup in hand, I am slightly addicted.  Meeting up with my with my girl friends at the local coffee shop on a Friday morning wouldn’t be right for me without my nice cup of tea.  In recent years coffee has made...

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Shoes

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Join The Community

The Thrive Tribe is a community of women who have chronic illness and is a great place for a cuppa and a chat. 

You may feel like no-one understands what its like living with your chronic illness or worrying everyday about your kids. That you are hanging on by a thread or the future may feel a little uncertain. In The Thrive Tribe we get that.

You value life and want to be the best version of you. To manage your symptoms effectively so that you can live your best life.

In the community we will be having real, open conversations about how you can do this. With my experience of living with multiple chronic illness’ and raising kids with CMT, EDS, PoTS and ME. I know that the struggle is real. I will be sharing guidance, challenges, my personal tips and real life stories to remind you of how this can become a reality now!

When you join the Tribe you can find your ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SELF-CARE and HANDY SELF-CARE CHECKLIST available in the files to download.

The 10 minute guide to understanding that self care is far more than having a bubble bath and lighting a scented candle. Why it is important to plan for if you have a chronic illness or are caring for someone who does and, a handy checklist to get you started with great self-care practices to support yous physical and mental health and that fit who you are!

 

How I Fake My Chronic Illness Symptoms

How I Fake My Chronic Illness Symptoms

I fake my EDS symptoms all the time.

Every day.

For as long as I can remember.

It is second nature, it’s why I am so good at it.

 

Now I don’t mean I’m faking the symptoms of my condition, making them up, exaggerating them, they are very real to me and they are ever present in my life.  Quite the opposite in fact, because of the invisibility of EDS I have become a master at faking being ‘normal’.

Here are the top twenty ways  that I have learnt conceal my illness on daily basis and to blend with the masses – to appear to be normal. How do you fake your chronic illness symptoms?

One. Smiling… I make a huge effort to have a happy life and try not to let things get me down.  Just because I am happy whilst being ill doesn’t mean that my conditions have disappeared, it simply means I have chosen to be happy in spite of my illness’, which is no mean feat.   I have mastered the ‘fine thanks’ response when someone asks me how I am, no one honestly wants to hear the truth!  It’s important to be happy, it’s good for your health.

 

Two. Make up…. I put my face on every single day, it is my mask for the real world and I like wearing it.  Only those people that know me very well can tell how I am feeling behind the smile and the make up.  By looking into my eyes.  Even if it’s just a bit of mascara and a sweep of blusher it makes me feel better about the day ahead, more human.
 

Three.  Ditching the kettle… I have boiling water plumbed in because I can’t lift a kettle without a dislocation.

Four.  A pushchair… When my children were young my mobility was at its worst.  I would get out the buggy to hold on to when I walked along even if the children didn’t need to sit in it particularly.  I would let them hold on and walk slowly with me while it held me up.  I miss the fact that they are all too big for a pushchair.

Five. Leaning… Standing is hard work 1) because of pain and 2) because standing still makes me dizzy and when things are bad I can be clammy, shivery, breathless and can even faint when upright.  You will notice me just propping myself up on a table or a doorway.

Six. Fidgeting… Sitting and standing for any length of time is uncomfortable and moving just helps.  Fidgeting when I’m standing, calf pumps, fist pumps or squeezing a stress ball hidden deep in my coat pocket can also get the blood pumping to avoid me passing out.

Seven.  Standing up slowly… Always, to minimise the head rush and dizziness.

Eight.  Pacing… I am driven, I like getting loads done but I would find that I would push and push only to crash later.  Pacing used to be my enemy but I have had to work hard to make it my friend.  All of my daily activities are paced and no one would ever know! It increases the amount that I can achieve over a given period instead of feeding into the boom bust cycle.

Nine.  Hiding fatigue… You can’t see fatigue, unless you know me well and on the days when my fatigue is at it’s worst you won’t see me at all because I physically can not get out of bed or leave the house.  My life is planned 24/7 to manage this element but sometimes it creeps up on me and catches me out.  I have collapsed before unable to put one foot in front of the other and been rushed to hospital.  People won’t know or understand how bad this can get because they just wont see it.

eds pain scale graphic

Ten.  Managing pain… I have become an expert at hiding my pain (and I have a pretty high pain threshold), you won’t see the amount of medication that I take, the ice, wheat cushions, massage, hot baths, propping my joints with anything just to get comfy.   I am a master of disguise too, I can be standing, smiling and chatting with someone with a rib subluxated, unable to relocate it and unless I knew you well I wouldn’t even tell you!

Eleven.  Planning… If I do have something particular on a certain day then an immense amount of planning goes into it.  I’m still paying for a Spooky Walk for Halloween a week later in terms of pain and autonomic dysfunction because I had a meal out two days before and didn’t plan enough time for my body to recover in between.

Twelve.  Avoiding obstacles… This has become like second nature.  This time of year just walking to the car there are obstacles, the blanket of Autumn leaves may look pretty but in the dry they mask the unevenness of the pavement beneath and in the wet they are slippery.  I always walk around things where I can, or take another route.

graphis saying 'how do you fake normal when you are chronically ill?'

Thirteen.  Wearing a vest… I have the ability to stand in 30 degree heat in the summer and still have goosebumps, I wear vest all year round.  I’m also fond of a scarf  gloves and a hat.

Fourteen.  Orthotics / braces… These are hidden in my shoes, under my jeans.  Unless something visible like my wrist or thumb was braced you would never know.  There was one time this year my ankle was in fact braced as it was subluxated and wouldn’t relocate.  A mum at school spotted it and questioned if I was wearing a tag!  What she didn’t notice was the excruciating pain on my face as I had to bare weight, I have learnt to hide it so well.

Fifteen.  Tight clothes… Skinny jeans aren’t a fashion statement for me they are a necessity to hold my hips and pelvis in place and increase proprioception to my joints.

Sixteen. Eating well… Eating small regular meals helps me to manage a whole host of gastro and autonomic symptoms as does eating gluten free.  If you went out for dinner with me would you know by my choices?

Seventeen.  Being vague with arrangements… This is another one of my coping methods, I can never tell how I will be feeling from one day to the next let alone a week or two in advance so I tend not to make definite plans unless I have to.

Eighteen.  Linking arms with a friend… To steady myself perhaps because I’m hurting or if I’m walking somewhere tricky; slippy leaves, a wet floor or if its icy.

Nineteen.  Friends… Making time for a regular cuppa with friends to chat about anything else but Ehlers Danlos, health and hospitals.

Twenty.  A sense of humour… This is so important when faking being normal.  Being able to laugh at yourself and having the ability to look back on situations that have happened with a smile (because there are many) is a must.

 

So when someone calls me a faker in a way the are right, I have become a master at concealing my EDS symptoms in order to just live.  I choose when to talk about what is going on for me and when not to and who needs to know that information about me.

What I’ve learned is that my conditions are a part of me, they are not who I am.

They deserve their space in my life in order that I can manage them effectively but they are not all that I am. I put many things in my life over and above chronic illness symptoms and disability and that ensures that it is kept in perspective.  I’m a mum, wife, coach, educator and advocate – I love to draw, to write, to read, to eat in fancy restaurants and enjoy time at the local pub in front of a roaring fire.  I love the sky and all its colours and to watch the sunrise with a nice cup of tea.  Absolutely all of these things consume my thoughts before chronic illness gets a look in and that is key to living your best life even with an illness or disability.

 

The original version of this post was published on My Stripy Life and was picked up and published on The mighty Site you can check it out here and my other published posts.

Here are some of the comments on the post…

Oh, the pushchair….how I empathize with that. I just sank an eye watering amount of money into what will be our last stroller…my daughter is almost 5, and she rarely rides in it, but when she runs out of energy, she is DONE and at 40lbs, is too much for me to carry for very long/far. I get the odd funny look at her in the stroller, but frankly I don’t care. If it helps us get out when my joints are angry at me, and when she is having a rough day, people can just mind their own business.

I do so many of these! Thank you so much for sharing, now I don’t feel like I’m the only one. I sometimes wonder whether I should actually be honest about how I’m feeling with people, but from experience, unless they’re already close to me, they don’t usually pay any attention even if I do tell them the truth. I sometimes we could do with a hug, so I’m sending one to you to say well done, not in a patronising way, but in a wow you’re amazing way. To have gone through that much and still function each day, even if deep down you don’t feel like you are, you’re truly amazing.
Hi you are a very courageous woman my lovely and as the comment made by Linda my partner has this nasty condition, she also has O, I, brittle bones she never complains and yet like yourself is in constant pain . The drs told us it is very rare disease but im not so sure its that rare as we have read and heard about so many more people who have this disease .thanks for sharing your story with everyone my partner felt quite alone before but is now seeing she isnt on her own I love her so much and it tares me apart not being able to take her pain away.xxxx
Sounds exactly like our daughter who is 16 years old. I sent it to my husband and if he would have not known it was written by someone else, he would have thought our daughter wrote it. Thank you for sharing. Having a child who as EDS has not been an easy feat lately, especially, when she is also a teenager. It is nice to know there are others who have experienced the same exact symptoms as she is currently.

The first week it went up it was the most read post on The Mighty Site.

Please share your thoughts below – others would love to hear. Be Mighty!

 

graphic with the words 'How i fake my chronic illness symptoms @sarahwellscoach

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Join The Community

The Thrive Tribe is a community of women who have chronic illness or are a parent to a child who has an illness or disability.

You may feel like no-one understands what its like living with your chronic illness or worrying everyday about your kids. That you are hanging on by a thread or the future may feel a little uncertain. In The Thrive Tribe we get that.

You value life and want to be the best version of you. To manage your symptoms effectively so that you can live your best life. Or, to support your children to live theirs.

In the community we will be having real, open conversations about how you can do this. With my experience of living with multiple chronic illness’ and raising kids with CMT, EDS, PoTS and ME. I know that the struggle is real. I will be sharing guidance, challenges, my personal tips and real life stories to remind you of how this can become a reality now!

When you join the Tribe you can find your ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SELF-CARE and HANDY SELF-CARE CHECKLIST available in the files to download.

The 10 minute guide to understanding that self care is far more than having a bubble bath and lighting a scented candle. Why it is important to plan for if you have a chronic illness or are caring for someone who does and, a handy checklist to get you started with great self-care practices to support yous physical and mental health and that fit who you are!

 

Shoes

Shoes

Shoes… shoes… shoes
Shoes are a girls best friend, you can never have enough, they can make you feel ten feet tall, on top of the world. It’s true for some, I once had a friend that would put on her heels on a Saturday night and would immediately lose a stone.

Give a girl the right shoes and she can conquer the world. 

Marylin Monroe

But these women clearly don’t have my feet!

My life has been blighted by shoes.  When I was six or seven I can remember sneaking out in my friends ballerina pumps, I couldn’t really walk in them, the fact that the memory is so vivid thirty years on proves that! For once I wasn’t walking around in my sensible Clarks, T bar sandals.  I understand that my mum was trying to look after my feet, she knew what I needed even without a diagnosis to tell her, no doubt she could tell by the way that I walked and the amount of times that I fell over fresh air but as a little girl I just wanted to be a princess.

Now I should have known things weren’t quite right when as kids we decided to catch the bus to the local ice rink to go ice skating, I would have been about eleven.  I laced up my boots and it is safe to say that I couldn’t even stand in the boots off of the ice.  Supported on both sides (putting a new meaning to the song lyrics ‘lean on me’) I made my way to the rink.  I tentatively stepped a toe onto the ice, I remember standing glued to the boards as my friends skated off one by one, by the time they had done a lap I had conceded and hung up my boots.  I like a challenge but I’m a realist.

 

Then there were the shoes that I tried to walk in, when I was a teen and rebelling against my God given feet, heels…. No sexy Louboutin’s going on here, Oh no! Chunky thick heeled, preferably lace up (to offer more support) boots and they had to be boots or I wouldn’t have taken a step in the first place.  I lost count of the amount of times I would fall walking into a club or the dance floor.  It wasn’t always the shoes to blame, sometimes it was a dislocation, sometimes I just couldn’t tell I was falling until I hit the deck so made no attempt at all to save myself.  But I remember fondly (and so will my friends) some good nights out by the magnificent falls.

 

The shoe mistakes, there have been many.  Years ago I used to long just to walk in nice shoes, I would try them on in the shop like Cinderella when really with my feet I was more a kin to one of the ugly sisters.  If I could get the shoe on my foot I would convince myself that they would be okay, only to realise when they had been sitting in a box for a year that they were another shoe mistake. As the years have gone by I am much less fussy about what they look like, I am a realistic, I reside in one brand of super wide flip flops in the summer and boots form autumn through to spring.  I grieve when a trusted pair of boots finally fall apart like I’m losing pet that has become part of the family.  As I get older my expectations have shifted somewhat, I long now to be able to wear a pair of converse pumps in the summer or flat sandals to a wedding.

There was the time my son saw a pair of stiletto heels, he would have been about two and a half and we were visiting my friend, her shoes sat neatly on the stairs after she had worn them out the night before.  At this point in life I think I had given up on trying to walk in any type of heel at all, he had never seen a pair of shoes like that, I remember the look on his face as he questioned what they were, to him they really were like a prop from a fairy tale.

I have become a master at dressing around my feet, my outfits wouldn’t necessarily be the ones that I would choose if I could put on any shoes and step out in them but I’ve learnt the art of compromise. Skirts with boots and tights.  A floor length gown to a black tie event (with no split) so no one can see what is lurking underneath and in my younger days I was an expert at drawing attention to other areas with the clothes that I wore so no one even noticed my shoes!!

Twenty years ago when I first met my husbands family they thought that no one could possibly top my sister-in-laws lovely feet but I stole her crown clean away, and no one has come close to it since. I hope that my daughter never does.  She is already beginning to understand the pain that shoes can bring as she longs to walk in a summer sandal or a normal school shoe but is resigned to high top trainers and boots even in the 30 degree heat, just to keep some sort of mobility.  She knows how to rock her Dr Martens with style and has the smile and the wit to match.

Shoes will never be my friend as I struggle to find them, they cause me pain and they dictate the clothes that I wear but I will endeavour to stress less about them as time goes on.

Give a girl the right attitude and she can conquer the world. Shoes are optional. 

Sarah Wells

I’d love to hear you comments… does your attitude give you power over your shoes or do your shoes have power over you? It’s a fine line with CMT and EDS.

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