When you live with chronic illness ‘crashes’ are inevitable no matter how hard you try to avoid them.

Getting the balance between doing too much or too little is like walking a tightrope.  Mostly for me a crash comes when I do too much for too long.  I’m not stupid and I have lived with this for long enough to recognise the subtle signs that my body gives me, trying to warn me to slow down, to take a breath, to re-charge.  However more often than not I ignore them or think that just this once it will be OK if I push through.

Over the years my ability to manage my crashes has improved but every so often my body will throw me a curve ball.  It’s like it trying to prove who is really running the show.

I’ve learnt that the only way to avoid a monumental crash is respect the boss, to listen to my body and treat it with respect.  To manage, to pace and to keep all the plates spinning delicately in the air.

 

How the holiday Season may effect your chronic illness symptoms

The holiday season throws another element into the mix, although many of us will be experiencing quieter Christmas celebrations this year due to the COVID pandemic. Other factors may have an effect on how well you manage your symptoms and how you feel.

  • Routine. Extra time off, late nights or lay ins, even different meal times may impact your symptoms.
  • Sleep. Your sleep pattern may alter because of those late nights and lazy mornings but pay attention to the other factors may also alter your sleep during the holiday season, including the food you eat, alcohol, routine and how much energy you use during the day.
  • Food. The food that you eat may be different to usual over the holiday period, this can affect symptoms
  • Alcohol. Now I’m not saying that you shouldn’t raise a glass with you Turkey this Christmas (I’m not the alcohol police!) but its really important to be aware of the medications that you take and the possible interactions.  Also how it affects your sleep, your mood and your symptoms.
  • Travel/ socialising with friends. Depending where you are in the world this year you may be allowed to meet up with family and that may involve travelling, which can make you more tired.  Coupled with socialising and catching up with family and friends this can take its toll on how you feel.

6 Signs that a chronic illness crash may be coming

Here are the top 5 ways to spot a crash is on its way and try to do something about it before it floors you.  Hopefully by recognising the signs and acting on them a crash can be lessened or avoided.

  1. A really big appetite.  For a few days before a crash hits it is like my body needs extra fuel, I often crave sweet, empty carbs.
  2. Being teary.  From crying at Countryfile’s stories promoting the big Ramble for Children in Need watching the Undateables (I love a happy ending) to welling up when I have to ask my kids to do their HW for the 11th time.
  3. Brain fog. Why did I want to put the milk away in the oven?  I have to think extra hard when I’m doing something as I lose my train of thought really quickly.  Focussing on reading is impossible and I forget why I have walked into a room in the first place.
  4. Being cold.  I can’t regulate my body temperature at the best of times but when a crash is coming I’m cold all the time.
  5. Breathlessness.  From walking to the kitchen to pop the kettle on to sitting and having a conversation.
  6. Poor sleep. When a crash is coming I become tired but wired.

6 Things to do to minimise a chronic illness crash

  1. Rest. Simple to say but impossible to actually put into practice when you have demands placed on you from family, friends, work or study. Resting completely it is the best way to stop the crash getting worse. Rest now.
  2. Act immediately. When you know (and in my case finally admit to yourself) that a crash is coming you have to stop. The sooner the act the easier that it is to minimise the fallout. I have been at my poorliest when I have pushed and pushed through.
  3. Delegate. You are not invincible and not everything is ‘your job’. My problem is that my family don’t always do the things that I ask them to do, a) to my standard, or, b) the second I ask them to do it – which just stresses me out! but I have to learn that the house will not fall down and I will become well much quicker if I let them help. And it’s never a bad idea to organise my lazy kids with some chores 😉
  4. Prepare. Think ahead – A little time spent planning things in advance can save heaps of energy later. From online shopping to planning your tasks and energy over a week. If you have something unavoidable to do plan good rest before and after.
  5. Ask for help. There is nothing wrong with asking for help, yet it is the thing I struggle the most with. Start with those people that you know best and that love you dearly. You might be surprised at how willing they are to lend a hand – I always am. From doing the school run for you or making dinner to doing the ironing. Think about what will help you the most and if people offer without you having to ask, say YES!!!
  6. Pace yourself. To get over a crash pacing is key and pulling back from non essential activities will help you to recover more quickly. I try to look ahead for a few weeks and plan my energy levels: I never have two busy days in a row, I plan plenty of time to recover from activities, I cancel non-essential activities or appointments and I only socialise with people that make my heart jump or if it’s something I’m really looking forward to.

I hope it helps you to recognise and act on the warning signs that a crash may be brewing, and to get back to normal more quickly (whatever normal is)!

 

If you enjoyed this post you may like…

Surviving a crash if you have a chronic a chronic illness or The signs or carer burnout and how to fix them.

Join The Community

The Thrive Tribe is a community of women who have chronic illness or are a parent to a child who has an illness or disability.

You may feel like no-one understands what its like living with your chronic illness or worrying everyday about your kids. That you are hanging on by a thread or the future may feel a little uncertain. In The Thrive Tribe we get that.

You value life and want to be the best version of you. To manage your symptoms effectively so that you can live your best life. Or, to support your children to live theirs.

In the community we will be having real, open conversations about how you can do this. With my experience of living with multiple chronic illness’ and raising kids with CMT, EDS, PoTS and ME. I know that the struggle is real. I will be sharing guidance, challenges, my personal tips and real life stories to remind you of how this can become a reality now!

When you join the Tribe you can find your ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SELF-CARE and HANDY SELF-CARE CHECKLIST available in the files to download.

The 10 minute guide to understanding that self care is far more than having a bubble bath and lighting a scented candle. Why it is important to plan for if you have a chronic illness or are caring for someone who does and, a handy checklist to get you started with great self-care practices to support yous physical and mental health and that fit who you are!

 

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